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An Examination Of The Role For Landscape Architects In The No Child Left Inside Movement

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An Examination Of The Role For Landscape Architects In The No Child Left Inside Movement

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dc.contributor.author Miller, Wade en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2009-09-16T18:16:45Z
dc.date.available 2009-09-16T18:16:45Z
dc.date.issued 2009-09-16T18:16:45Z
dc.date.submitted January 2009 en_US
dc.identifier.other DISS-10193 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10106/1647
dc.description.abstract The disconnection, or lack of interaction and experience, between children and nature has been coined Nature Deficit Disorder and popularized by Louv (Louv 2005, pp. 139-140). Current research and writing regarding the child and nature disconnect has spawned the No Child Left Inside movement. This movement is an initiative being adopted by cities, states, federal agencies and other organizations committed to reconnecting children with nature by providing a wide range of opportunities to experience nature directly, while building the next generation of environmentally conscious citizens.This research examines how landscape architecture is viewed by those associated with Children and Nature Network (C&NN), the primary organization formed to encourage and support other organizations that are active in this movement. Leaders of this organization include published authors, educators, entrepreneurs, researchers, academics, youth leaders, and business and organizational leaders. Through C&NN, these professionals are the leading proponents of the No Child Left Inside movement. While some of the research and literature mentions specific areas such as open space planning, park design, school design, and playground design; the landscape architect is not recognized as a central figure in the movement to reconnect children and nature.The hypothesis of this research is that the field of landscape architecture is uniquely qualified and positioned to address this topic through open space frameworks, urban planning, urban design, park design, schoolyard design, residential design, and children's gardens. In this study, open-ended interviews of researchers, authors, and supporters associated with C&NN are used to identify the perceptions of the role that landscape architects play in reconnecting nature and children. These selected professionals share their perceptions based on their knowledge and experience in this area. The findings show that there is much opportunity for landscape architects to influence the realization of nature and children reconnected. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Taylor, Pat en_US
dc.language.iso EN en_US
dc.publisher Landscape Architecture en_US
dc.title An Examination Of The Role For Landscape Architects In The No Child Left Inside Movement en_US
dc.type M.L.A. en_US
dc.contributor.committeeChair Taylor, Pat en_US
dc.degree.department Landscape Architecture en_US
dc.degree.discipline Landscape Architecture en_US
dc.degree.grantor University of Texas at Arlington en_US
dc.degree.level masters en_US
dc.degree.name M.L.A. en_US
dc.identifier.externalLink https://www.uta.edu/ra/real/editprofile.php?onlyview=1&pid=1152
dc.identifier.externalLinkDescription Link to Research Profiles

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